FAQ - Frequently Asked Questions

How do I know if you’re the right therapist for me?

Choosing a therapist is a very personal decision. Therapy is only as effective as the relationship between therapist and client and because of this I believe the best way to determine if a psychotherapist is right for you is to book a session and simply meet with her or him and to trust your instincts when you are with them. Ask yourself: “Can I see myself feeling safe and comfortable with this person? Does it seem like they *get* me ?”

How do you work as a therapist?

As your therapist, I work to create a safe and really special environment where, for 50 minutes each week, the world can slow down and together we can compassionately explore, understand, and transform behaviors, thoughts, and patterns that may be holding you back from ultimately living the life you want to live. My style as a therapist is warm and challenging, direct and engaging, and I’m relationally-oriented. What that means is that I truly believe that it is through our early relationships that certain patterns get established and certain wounds created; and it is only then through relationship that these patterns and woundings can shift and be healed. When we work together as therapist and client, it’s actually the relationship between us that becomes the therapy in addition to the all of the ways we explore, address and clarify the content you bring into the room. You can learn more about my therapy approach by visiting the Treatment Philosophy page.

How long does therapy last? How will I know when I’m done?

The duration of therapy looks different for everyone. For some, six months following an acute stressor (such as a breakup or loss of a loved one) is adequate. For others looking to change deeply rooted patterns and belief systems, the process may take longer. On average, I see my clients for minimum 12 months. You can trust that you and I will keep checking in throughout our work together to determine if it feels appropriate and timely to end therapy.

What can I expect from our first session?

Our first in-person meeting is what’s known as an intake session. It’s different from a traditional therapy session because this will be a time for me to gather your case history, and together we’ll talk about why you have decided to pursue therapy and what your goals are for our time together. It’s also an opportunity for you to get to know me, to ask me any questions you may have, and to see how you feel in my offices and with me. At the end of the session, we can decide together if it feels right to move forward in scheduling another session and beginning the rest of the therapeutic journey. Please note that this first session is not complimentary; it is a fully paid session. 

How long is a therapy session?

Therapy sessions are 60 minutes in length. Occasionally, and as my schedule permits, my clients will book a 90-minute if they are experiencing a crisis or acute stress in their lives that week.

Is what I share confidential?

Absolutely. What you share with me in our sessions is completely confidential except in the case of 1) immediate threat of harm to self or other, 2) suspicion of child or dependent elder abuse, 3) in the case of a court subpoena. We’ll discuss all of this and my other office policies during your initial intake session.

Do you accept insurance?

Yes! I accept most commercial insurance plans. For a detailed list, please visit the Rates & Insurance page.

What kind of clients do you work with?

I work with individuals of all different identities and ethnicities from all over the world. Many of my clients are professionals and I also work extensively with graduate& graduate students too. Also, while some of my clients have been to therapy before, the vast majority of my clients – about 80% – are first-timers to therapy. Finally, while my clients’ professions, ages, ethnicities, gender expressions, sexual orientations, religions, family backgrounds, and lifestyles vary widely, all of them share something in common: they are people who are in pain and who are at a point where they’re willing to commit and invest in themselves and in therapy in order to change and create something different in their lives.

I don’t want to just talk about how I’m feeling; I actually want things to change in my life.

I think there’s a big misconception out there that therapy means just talking and talking about the past without ever taking action on the present. I certainly don’t operate that way as a therapist. While we will always create space to talk about your past and the feelings that surface as we explore this, I’m a very direct and engaged therapist and actively work with my clients to design interventions, exercises, and thoughtful action steps if that’s what you’re looking for as part of therapy.

If I go to therapy there must be something wrong with me; I should be able to handle this/figure it out on my own, right?

Making the decision to seek out therapy isn’t a sign of weakness; it’s a wise act of self-care to reach out for support from professionals when there’s a challenge you need help with. You’d reach out to a doctor for help setting your broken bone or to a lawyer if you needed help filing divorce paperwork, wouldn’t you? When it comes to your mental and emotional health it’s no different. Reaching out for professional support is an act of self-care to address the challenges you’re facing.

If you have any additional questions, please contact the office today!